Tag Archives: income

How To Increase Your Revenue and Improve Your Results

Inside of cabin with brown wrap around coach, stone by wood burning fireplace

 

 

Do you know what your ideal guests want? Who are you trying to attract to stay at your inn? The more you understand about who you want to serve, the better you become at meeting their specific needs.

Know What Your Guests Love About You and Your Inn

Are you getting their attention with the headlines you use? What do you receive the most compliments about from your guests? Be sure to feature what you know guests love.

The Benefits Of Frequent Guests and Guest Referrals

It is much easier to host returning guests than to find new guests. Do you offer incentives for frequent stays? Do you reward guests who refer you new business? This could be complimentary room upgrades and other incentives.

There Are Other Ways To Earn Money (Besides Overnight Stays)

Do you offer more than just the option of staying overnight? There are other ways of earning additional money. Why limit your hospitality earning potential?

Earn More By Offering Related Guest Products

You can offer additional related products and services to “up-sell” your guests. Of course, they have to really want what you offer. The best way to know what your guests want, is to ask them directly!

Increase Your Income With Guest Packages

Be sure to show professional pictures of each item for sale or that comes as part of a package. Guest packages can be centered around activities, specific themes, special occasions, and the four seasons. Think about what your guests like to do and the common reasons for their visit.

Host Events and Groups To Boost Your Earnings

You can also host private events and groups. Do you have enough space to host weddings and/or private local groups? The more details you can provide, the more inquiries you will receive.

Most People Buy Based Upon Their Emotions (Not Logic)

Do you tap into their fear of missing out? Most people making purchasing decisions based on their emotions. Expiration dates motivate!

Share Content That People Can Connect With

Do you provide them with enough content (blog posts, emails, website information, social media) to convince them that your place is the next place they want to visit? Share inspiring stories.

Prominently Feature Your Guest Testimonials

Do you feature guest testimonials on your website and in your social media? People put more stock into what previous guests say about you than what you say about you. That is why online review sites are so popular.

In Summary

The more of these suggestions you implement, the greater your odds of hospitality success. You can become the go-to accommodations in your local area.

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

PAII Conference January 15, 2014

The Professional Association of Innkeepers International is holding a four-day conference starting Monday January 13.  This post will focus on day 3, Wednesday January 15.  The opportunities to learn abound. Speakers will be discussing topics including:

  • Tips for Running an Efficient Bed and Breakfast
  • The Basic Gourmet
  • Inn Property Valuation
  • Video Marketing 101
  • Insurance Strategies to Maximize Coverage and Minimize Cost
  • Capture Your Guest in Under 30 Seconds
  • Panel of Marketing Experts To Answer Questions
  • Google: Get Your Geek On!
  • Trends in Bed Linens
  • Back Office Secrets: Making Your Business Work When You are Not There
  • Trade Show Open with Lunch and Dessert
  • Inns and Outs of Serving Gluten-Free Desserts
  • Understanding Your Finances
  • Major Forces Transforming Travel in Today’s Market
  • Creating Your Niche for More Profits
  • Innkeeping Can Make a Difference: retreats, classes, support groups, outreach, etc.
  • Create a Winning Purchasing Agreement
  • Hands-On Public Relations
  • Elements of Hospitality Marketing
  • More Than a Bed and Breakfast: Innovative Programs and Partnerships to Increase Income and Publicity

This will be followed by a 25th anniversary celebration of the Professional Association of Innkeepers International.  The dress will be casual and there will be barbecue, bluegrass music, and dancing.  This is the last evening of the conference. Another opportunity to make more connections with other important people in this industry.

History of the B&B Industry in the United States

History of the U.S. B&B Industry

The history of the U.S. B&B Industry began when travel for business and/or pleasure in the United States started in the 1700’s.  Many coaching or stagecoach inns, common in England and the Eastern United States, typically provided stabling for horses and lodging for travelers.  However, the accommodations were extremely modest (at best).

 

Once railroads were constructed, the convenience of railroads provided a huge boost in travel comfort, and hundreds of hotels were constructed close to train stations to accommodate growing numbers of travelers.

As the United States industrialized, more people had time and the discretionary income for travel.  Summer escapes from the sweltering cities to cooler mountain or seaside villages became popular. Wealthy families summered in private villas or luxury resorts, while the working classes headed for boarding houses.

During the Great Depression in the United States, taking in boarders to help meet expenses proliferated. Homes located on state routes (this was long before Interstate Highways) often posted signs reading Tourist Home or Guests, where travelers could typically find a room for the night for about $2, usually including breakfast.

Travel to Europe boomed after World War II; a strong U.S. dollar allowed millions of Americans to discover England’s and Ireland’s B&B’s, and equivalent accommodations on the Continent. Throughout the 1980’s, the seeds for the B&B boom were planted.

Interestingly, although history of the U.S. B&B industry began with informal, inexpensive places to stay with shared baths and minimal amenities, they are now largely luxury accommodations with high levels of comfort, service, and luxury.

 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography