Category Archives: Names

How to Choose Your Bed and Breakfast Name

outside of blue historic bed and breakfast with landscaped yard and iron fence with brick pillars

Your bed and breakfast name sets the tone for what your guests can expect.  A good name says a lot about an inn.  You want the name to be memorable and give a great first impression.  It is important to take your time and come up with a long list of potential names before deciding. Get a talented group of friends together and just start randomly calling out names.  Have someone write down all the bed and breakfast name suggestions.

 

Permit your gathering of people to suggest whatever name comes to mind.  By allowing everything to be spoken, eventually you will have a list of great potential bed and breakfast names.

 

Only after you have generated this list of names should you then start to evaluate them.  Make sure that your bed and breakfast name is:

  • Simple to pronounce aloud by others (have others repeat the name aloud)
  • Spelled like it sounds (makes it easier to find)
  • Without an unintended meaning (think of the words in various contexts)
  • Not too common (make sure it is fresh)
  • Appropriate to your local surroundings (e.g. do not have beach in the name unless there really is one)
  • Not too funny (this may suggest you do not care about your hospitality business)
  • Easy for guests to remember (name recognition)

 

Top business blogger Brandon Gaille recommends the following practical advice when it comes to finding the perfect business name:

  • It should be easy to recognize in an email subject line or a tweet
  • Check the international implications of your name (make sure it is not offensive in any other language)
  • Unique names can come from inventing a name, adding a letter, dropping a letter, or adding an “ly” or an “ify” on the end (however, as mentioned, spelling it like it sounds makes it easier for people to find)
  • Make sure you reserve the business name (or a shortened version) consistently across all social media accounts

 

Other words for bed and breakfast include:

  • B&B
  • cabins
  • cottage
  • country inn
  • estate
  • farm
  • garden inn
  • guest house
  • hideaway
  • house
  • hotel
  • inn
  • lodge
  • manor
  • mansion
  • oasis
  • palace
  • place
  • ranch
  • resort
  • street inn
  • suites
  • valley
  • village inn

 

Visualize how your business name will look in a logo, outdoor sign, and on your website.  Be sure to get your own email address to be something like:

innkeeper@yourbedandbreakfastname.com

 

When you know what you want to call your bed and breakfast, you must make sure that the domain name (website address) is available before you register your business name.  If there are already bed and breakfast inns with that name (even in a different state), it is best to choose a different name or a variation of the name to avoid confusion.

 

Above all, make sure you absolutely love your bed and breakfast name since you will likely say it over and over throughout your time as a bed and breakfast owner.  Smart innkeepers ask for ideas from others and take plenty of time when they choose their bed and breakfast name.

 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

 

10+ B&B Bedroom Names

guest bedroom with bed and luxurious sink with mirror

 

Bed and Breakfasts traditionally name each bedroom available to guests. This allows B&B owners, as well as their guests, to be able to distinguish between the rooms.  The B&B bedroom names can be based on any number of reasons.  Here are 10+ ways B&B bedroom names come about:

 

  • Activity (such as a hobby or a sport like photography or football)
  • Amenity (like a private hot tub or their own personal fireplace in the room)
  • Color in the room (like red or lavender walls or bedding)
  • Country or culture the room represents (such as China or Mexico)
  • Famous people (including famous writers and leaders like Hemingway and Lincoln)
  • History (named after the original residents; associated with the time period it was built)
  • Local connection (near a famous local attraction; common local flowers or foods)
  • Occasion (such as the Honeymoon Suite or Anniversary Room)
  • Style the room is decorated in (such as Victorian or French Country)
  • Theme (including a particular animal or season)
  • Type of location (such as on the beach or in a castle)

As bed and breakfast owners, you can have fun with what you name your rooms. Be creative and come up with names of rooms that people would like to say they stayed in. Sometimes B&B owners have signs by the doors to let guests know they have come to the right room.

Naming the rooms in your house gives your bed and breakfast character and distinguishes it from other B&B’s. This also allows your guests to recommend the particular rooms they stayed in by their B&B bedroom names to other people. 

You are welcome to share a link to your (named) rooms page on your bed and breakfast website as well as to tell us the reason they were named that way.

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

Bed and Breakfasts Named After Queen Anne

named Queen Anne

 

We feature seven bed and breakfasts named Queen Anne.  The Queen Anne style in Britain refers to either the English Baroque architectural style approximately of the reign of Queen Anne (reigned 1702–1714), or a revived form that was popular in the last quarter of the 19th century and the early decades of the 20th century (known as Queen Anne revival).

 

In the United States, the so-called “Queen Anne style” is loosely used of a wide range of picturesque buildings with “free Renaissance” details rather than of a specific style in its own right. “Queen Anne” is broadly applied to architecture, furniture and decorative arts of the period 1880 to 1910.

 

Distinctive features of American Queen Anne style (rooted in the English style) can include:

  • dominant front-facing gable, often cantilevered out beyond the plane of the wall below
  • overhanging eaves
  • round, square, or polygonal tower(s)
  • shaped and Dutch gables
  • a porch covering part or all of the front facade, including the primary entrance area
  • a second-story porch or balconies
  • pedimented porches (a low gable, typically triangular with ahorizontal cornice and raking cornices)
  • differing wall textures (such as patterned wood shingles shaped into varying designs, including resembling fish scales, terra cotta tiles, relief panels, or wooden shingles over brickwork, etc.)
  • dentils (any of a series of closely spaced, small, rectangular blocks, used especially in classical architecture )
  • classical columns
  • spindle work
  • oriel and bay windows
  • horizontal bands of leaded windows
  • monumental chimneys
  • painted railing with support balusters
  • wooden or slate roofs
  • wraparound front porch
  • front gardens often had wooden fences

 

Now that we know what they typically look like, the following bed and breakfast inns, found in the United States, are all named Queen Anne:

 

Queen Anne B&B Inn in Denver, ColoradoBuilt in 1879 and 1886, the Queen Anne was originally occupied by the Tabor family. The doors were opened to the public in 1987, when the Queen Anne became the first urban bed and breakfast in Denver.

 

Queen Anne B&B and Spa in Fredricksburg, Texas: Built in 1904, the elegant Queen Anne is truly the grande dame of Victorian architecture.

 

Queen Anne Guest House in Galena, Illinois: Their Victorian Queen Anne style B & B is situated 4 blocks from Main Street where the historic shops and restaurants of Galena begin.  The Queen Anne has been featured in many books, including America’s Painted Ladies.

 

Queen Anne Hotel in San Francisco, CaliforniaThis jewel of Victorian architecture has 48 elegant rooms & suites and features a lovely Parlor and Library with English & American antique furnishings, crackling fireplaces, chandeliers, and vibrant works of art.

 

Reagan’s Queen Anne B&B in Hannibal, Missouri: “Write your own story” when you stay in Mark Twain’s boyhood hometown of Hanibal while enjoying their graceful Painted Lady and Victorian jewel. Find gracious hospitality and comfortable elegance in their restored lumberman’s masterpiece, featuring original magnificently carved ornate woodwork, brass lighting fixtures, and stained glass windows.

 

The Queen Anne Bed and Breakfast in Natchitoches, Louisiana: At almost 100 years old, The Queen Anne continues to define elegance while offering excellent location in this unique city, combining American history with French sophistication.

 

The Queen Anne House Bed and Breakfast in Harrison, Arkansas: The Queen Anne House is an elegantly restored two story Victorian Home nestled in the beautiful Ozark Mountains, only blocks from the historic town square of Harrison Arkansas.  Enjoy their gingerbread trim, stained glass windows, Infinity spa hot tub, claw foot tubs and showers, beautiful gardens, a large wrap around front porch with rockers, an enclosed glass solarium, a beautifully ornate fireplace, and period antiques.

 

Several bed and breakfast inns were built using the Queen Anne architectural style.  These bed and breakfasts thought it important enough to include that in their bed and breakfast name.  What is the architectural style of your bed and breakfast and is that included in your bed and breakfast name? Feel free to leave a comment below.

 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

Bed and Breakfasts Named After Metals

 

named metals

Bronze Antler Bed and Breakfast

 

 

Did you know that there are bed and breakfasts named metals?  Well, they at least have a metal in their name (or implied in their name).

 

 

 

 

The following is a short alphabetical listing of some “metallic” inns in the United States:

 

Advice 5 Cents: Duck, North Carolina (after all 5 cents is a nickel!)

 

Bronze Antler Bed and Breakfast: Joseph, Oregon (the innkeepers can arrange for bronze foundry tours upon request)

 

Coppersmith Inn Bed and Breakfast: Galveston, Texas (the second owner, Paul Shean, was a coppersmith from Ireland, hence their name)

 

Goldsmith Inn Bed and Breakfast: Missoula, Montana (the innkeepers have the last name Goldsmith; the Goldsmiths restored this beautiful historic property after it was planned to be demolished; it required moving this massive 4,000 square foot home)

 

Silver Heart Bed and Breakfast: Independence, Missouri (this historic home officially opened as a bed and breakfast in April of 2013; their sign has a large silver heart on it)

 

The Iron Gate Inn and Winery: Cedar City, Utah (the oldest Bed & Breakfast building in the Cedar City community opened as a bed and breakfast in June of 2002; and yes, the gate is made of iron)

 

Mercury Inn (formally named “Wild Iris Inn”): Portland, Maine (Mercury, a deity from ancient Roman mythology, was a protector and guide to travelers. He ensured that those in his care were given the best treatment he had to offer.  Mercury Inn seeks to offer the best in modern accommodations, local fare, and warm hospitality).

 

The Platinum Pebble: West Harwich, Massachusetts (centrally located on Cape Cod; “a pebble’s throw” from Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, Provincetown, and more; the word platinum may come from the fact that they receive rave reviews)

 

Tin Lizzie Inn at Yosemite: Fish Camp, California (Tin Lizzie takes its name from the Model T Ford which the public lovingly dubbed “The Tin Lizzie”; they have a replica 1890’s Victorian Model T, but it is only 2 years old.)

 

Each inn has its own story.  Whether the name is picked for its uniqueness, a nearby local attraction, an owner’s profession or last name, its physical features, its proximity to other attractions, or even an antique replica, it is always fun choosing the right name for your bed and breakfast inn.

 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

Bed and Breakfasts Named After Colors

named colors

 

 

Since colors can be quite attractive, it is not surprising that so many bed and breakfasts are named colors. We take a look at bed and breakfasts across the United States that have a color in their name.

 

 

This is a small sampling of colorful inns listed in alphabetical order by name:

 

Amber House Bed and Breakfast: Sacramento, California (their logo has grain in it like the “God Bless America” song lyric “amber waves of grain”)

 

Black Forest B&B Lodge and Cabins: Colorado Springs, Colorado (built in the majestic Black Forest, the highest point east of the Rocky Mountains)

 

Blue Mountain Bed and Breakfast: Missoula, Montana (the sky is so blue in this gorgeous mountain setting)

 

Brownstone Colonial Inn: Reinholds, Pennsylvania (a beautifully restored 18th century Georgian sandstone farmhouse)

 

Green Palm Inn: Savannah, Georgia (there are a lot of green palm trees in Savannah)

 

Indigo Inn: Charleston, South Carolina (in the year 1850, this property used built to serve as an indigo warehouse now it has been transformed into a lovely inn)

 

Orange Blossom Hacienda: Queen Creek, Arizona (of course they have orange blossoms for guests to enjoy)

 

Purple Mountain Lodge B&B and Spa: Crested Butte, Colorado (the lodge is a pretty shade of purple)

 

Red Gate Inn: McKinney, Texas (appropriately, they have a red gate and a red front door)

 

Silver Fountain Inn: Dover, New Hampshire (their silver fountain has lights so you can even see it at night)

 

The Golden Leaf Inn: Estes Park, Colorado (located on a scenic mountain with plenty of trees including golden leaves)

 

The Yellow House: Waynesville, North Carolina (there’s no surprise that the house is yellow in color)

 

Tickle Pink Inn: Carmel, California (sits on the original home site of State Senator Edward and Mrs. Bess Tickle, who loved flowers–especially pink flowers)

 

Violet Hill Bed and Breakfast: Middletown, New York (originally operated as a dairy farm in 1926, they now grow beautiful flowers for market)

 

White Porch Inn: Provincetown, Massachusetts (in keeping with their name, the whole inn, including the porch, is the color white)

 

If you stayed at (or own) a bed and breakfast with a color in its name, feel free to comment below with the name and its website address.  Bed and breakfast inns display lots of lovely colors.

 

Want to attract more guests to your inn?  Contact Kristi Dement of Bed and Breakfast Blogging to help you with your online marketing needs.

 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

Bed and Breakfasts Named After Animals

named after animals

 

Bed and breakfasts named after animals are easy to remember and can attract new guests. There is almost always a story behind the name.  If you are ever a guest at any of these inns, the innkeepers would most likely be happy to tell you how their name was chosen.

 

 

The following list of forty bed and breakfasts is just a small sampling of the many wonderful inns named after animals.  Animal lovers may be attracted to being a guest at these inns. Innkeepers choosing a bed and breakfast name for their inn can be inspired by these creative names.

 

In alphabetical order, here is the list of names along with their location in the United States:

 

Baby Quail Inn: Sedona, Arizona

 

Bird-In-Hand Village Inn and Suites: Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania

 

Black Dolphin Inn: New Smyrna Beach, Florida

 

Black Sheep Inn and Spa: Hammondsport, New York

 

Blue Buffalo Bed and Breakfast: Austin, Texas

 

Butterfly Hollow Bed and Breakfast: Gordonsville, Tennessee

 

Cheshire Cat Inn: Santa Barbara, California

 

Cinnamon Bear Creekside Inn: Sonoma, California

 

Dove Nest Bed and Breakfast: St. Joseph, Michigan

 

Dragonfly Ranch: Kona, Hawaii

 

Fox and Hound Bed and Breakfast: New Hope, Pennsylvania

 

Gilded Swan Bed and Breakfast: Ashtabula, Ohio

 

Grey Hare Inn: Traverse City, Michigan

 

Hummingbird Inn Bed and Breakfast: Reeds Spring, Missouri

 

Kangaroo House B&B on Orcas Island: Eastsound, Washington

 

Lion and the Rose Bed and Breakfast: Asheville, North Carolina

 

Meandering Moose Lodging: Talkeetna, Alaska

 

Mountain Horse Farm B&B and Spa: Naples, New York

 

Muley Twist Inn: Teasdale, Utah

 

Otter Creek Inn: Eau Claire, Wisconsin

 

Pheasant Run Farm Bed and Breakfast: Lancaster, Pennsylvania

 

Red Elephant Inn Bed and Breakfast: North Conway, New Hampshire

 

Sandy Salmon Bed and Breakfast Lodge: Brightwood, Oregon

 

Seal Cove Inn: Moss Beach, California

 

Sleeping Bulldog Bed and Breakfast: Seattle, Washington

 

Sparrow Hill Inn: Monroe, Georgia

 

Sun and Cricket Bed and Breakfast: Gibsonia, Pennsylvania

 

Swamp Rabbit Inn: Greenville, South Carolina

 

The Blushing Oyster Bed and Breakfast: Yarmouth Port, Massachusetts

 

The Bobcat Inn: Sante Fe, New Mexico

 

The Chicken Coop Bed ‘n Breakfast: Crawford, Georgia

 

The Flying Frog Bed and Breakfast: Franklin, Indiana

 

The Honking Goose Inn: Amsterdam, Ohio

 

The Mermaid and the Alligator: Key West, Florida

 

The Owl’s Perch: Robbinsville, North Carolina

 

The Peaceful Pelican: Palacios, Texas

 

The Scranton Seahorse Inn: Madison, Connecticut

 

The Whale Walk Inn and Spa: Eastham, Massachusetts

 

The Whimsical Pig Bed and Breakfast at Wolf Creek: Copley, Ohio

 

Yellow Turtle Inn: New Windsor, Maryland

 

Observations about some of these animal names:

 

  • Names include colors: black, blue, grey, red, and yellow.

 

  • Names include movies: “Cheshire Cat Inn” and “Fox and Hound B&B”

 

  • Describe a quality about their particular animal: gilded, meandering, sleeping, blushing, flying, honking, peaceful, and whimsical.

 

  • Describe where the animal is: butterfly hollow, dove nest, dragonfly ranch, seal cove, sparrow hill, chicken coop, owl’s perch, swamp rabbit, and whale walk.

 

  • Have two contrasting concepts: “Lion and Rose”, “Sun and Cricket”, and “Mermaid and Alligator.”

 

If you are thinking about naming your bed and breakfast after an animal, you could make the name fun like “The Whimsical Pig.”  Unusual color names like “Blue Buffalo” and “Red Elephant” will be easier for your guests to remember.  Innkeepers, make sure you like the name because you will be saying it again and again!

 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography