Category Archives: Guests

Can Your Guests Get To Know You Before They Arrive?

guests get to know you

Looking for an excellent example of an inn with a detailed “About Us” section (where guests get to know you), I found Blessings on State’s “Meet Your Innkeepers” page! Gwenn, Glenn, and Valerie along with Mary and Kelly are the talented team of people making Blessings a friendly and elegant choice for accommodations in Jacksonsville, Illinois.┬áCelebrating their 10th anniversary, Blessings at State loves hosting guests!

Here’s what I like about their “Meet Your Innkeepers” page that other innkeepers who do not yet have a detailed “About Us” section can emulate:

  • Enthusiasm about sharing their historic home and gardens with their guests
  • Welcoming guests to explore their local area including its shops and restaurants
  • Serving as local experts to share recommendations & develop travel itineraries
  • Developing strategic partnerships (their recommended restaurant offers guests of Blessings a complimentary appetizer or dessert)
  • Showing it serves a variety of guests including couples and business travelers
  • Pictures, names, and a specific description of what each person likes to do (Gwenn recommends that this is regularly updated)
  • Positive quotes and advice from the innkeepers to their guests (guests notice)
  • Life challenges overcome, talents used, and achievements made
  • If relevant, featuring pets and their amount of interaction with guests
  • True appreciation for how each person contributes to making the inn run well
  • Including participation in annual and community events
  • Membership in hospitality associations, Convention & Visitors Bureaus and Chambers of Commerce
  • Credentials like hospitality education or culinary expertise

Other things included in the Blessings “About Us” section of their website:

  • Awards (including TripAdvisor Certificates of Excellence and Glorious Garden)
  • Press Attention (the Red Chair even made a visit)
  • Top 10 Reasons to stay at their bed and breakfast
  • Discussion of history with long list of modern amenities (best of both worlds)
  • Breakfast options (formal dining, breakfast to go, sleep in with delivery)
  • Discussion of gracious living (grand entry, woodwork, chandeliers, baby grand)
  • Invitation to enjoy their porch and gardens
  • Policies (check in/out, parking, early/late night arrival, food allergies, smoking)
  • Contact Us page

Other details innkeepers can include:

  • Contests and Other Awards (recipe contest, green leader, etc.)
  • Participation at Hospitality Conferences and Culinary Events
  • Hobbies (such as photography or sports)
  • Favorites (favorite food, favorite recipe, favorite movie, favorite quote, etc.)

Many guests want to already “meet” the innkeepers BEFORE they arrive and the “About Us” and “Meet Your Innkeeper” sections really do help. So how well can guests get to know you before they arrive? Readers, if there something else about you (or your inn) that you share on your website, feel free to comment below.

Also, enjoy this video tour of Blessings on State Bed and Breakfast:

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How To Easily Attract More Guests To Your Inn

Attract-More-Guests

 

 

 

How to easily attract more guests to your inn?  One key component is to focus on good things to do, things to see, food to taste, places to explore, and places to go in your local area.

 

 

 

First, ask yourself these questions:

  • Why do most people visit our local area? (ex: for a romantic getaway in a secluded area or in a bustling city with lots of culture)
  • What do people like to do when they visit my area? (ex: attend a major business conference or participate in a marathon for your favorite cause)
  • How could I convince someone to want to visit my area? (ex: write great content about your local area and develop a reputation for showing warm hospitality to your guests)
  • Do I ask for guests to give me great online reviews?  Tell guests when they arrive,  that if for some reason they do not have a five star experience with you, to let them know in person how it could have been better.  For the few who were disappointed, perhaps offer them an upgraded room or some other perk if they decide to return again.  Make it your marketing mission to get 5 star reviews online so others will want to visit.

As you read this list, think about what you could feature in your local area:

Things to Do

  • Bowling
  • Canoeing
  • Cycling
  • Dancing
  • Fairs
  • Festivals
  • Fishing
  • Golf
  • Horseback riding
  • Hunting
  • Local shopping
  • Marathons
  • Miniature golf
  • Quilting
  • Reading
  • Shopping
  • Spa relaxing
  • Sports
  • Walking
  • Writing
  • Yoga

Things to See

  • Ballet
  • Bird watching
  • Book stores
  • Circus
  • Comedy
  • Concerts
  • Movies
  • Parades
  • Photography
  • Sporting events
  • Theatre

Food to Taste

  • Bakeries
  • Bars
  • Coffee shops
  • Food trucks
  • Ice cream parlors
  • Picnicking
  • Restaurants

Places to Explore

  • Attractions
  • Colleges and universities
  • Galleries
  • Historical landmarks
  • House hunting
  • Lakes
  • Malls
  • Mountains
  • Museums
  • Parks

Places to Go

  • Arenas
  • Churches
  • Conferences
  • Retreats
  • Stadiums
  • Workshops

attract more guests

 

Another important key to attract more guests is to establish relationships with these other local proprietors. Perhaps the business person will give you a reasonable deal in exchange for exclusively their particular type of business (such as using only one local florist for all of your flower arrangements).  Consider putting together guest packages that include local area businesses:

 

  • Reservations at a nearby restaurant
  • Tickets to a local game
  • Gift certificate to a relaxing spa (or your own spa)

When you categorize your blog posts, this allows your web visitors to easily go to the content that best fits their needs.  For example, some of my blog categories include:

  • Activities
  • Amenities
  • Conferences
  • Events
  • Food
  • Guests
  • Publicity
  • Renovating
  • Success

Write about what makes your area a destination for most people.  For some, this could mean featuring local concerts at your popular entertainment venues or dishes from award-winning restaurants.  If your bed and breakfast is in a place known for popular events (such as film festivals), be sure to promote that.

Write about things that make your inn unique.  Give them reasons to choose your inn for their accommodations.  Does your bed and breakfast have its own restaurant, horse farm, gift shop, spa, or something else?  Maybe you have amenities such as hot tubs and fireplaces in private guest rooms.  For those who cater to the business traveler, be sure to talk about your free wi-fi internet access as well as desks with comfortable office chairs.

In summary, write blog posts and put on social media the things that are popular in your local area as well as what makes your inn so special.  Offer packages that include things only found in your area.  Be sure to encourage five star reviews from your guests.  This is how you will easily attract more guests to your bed and breakfast inn!

 

Images by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

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Assumptions Can Be Wrong

assumptions can be wrong

Your bed and breakfast guests usually have questions. Be careful to understand their frame of reference when they ask a question. Assumptions can be wrong!

While I was a young student at Michigan State University, I lived in an international dorm. For those of you who don’t know, Michigan State is located in East Lansing, Michigan. One of the reasons I chose to attend the university was that I lived only two hours away in a town called Holland, Michigan.

When an international student asked me what I was going to do over the weekend, I replied, “Go home to Holland.” She looked shocked and asked with a puzzled look, “Only for the weekend?” I had failed to take into account that she was thinking of Holland, Netherlands. Actually, the Netherlands is the country my great-grandmother and her family came from when they relocated to Holland, Michigan.

We laughed when we both understood we were talking about two completely different parts of the world. I wrongly assumed that since we were both currently living in the state of Michigan, that she would have heard of my local Michigan town called Holland! Remember assumptions can be wrong!

Often when recommending places your guests can visit and things they can do in your area, please remember my advice to never make assumptions. You could have an FAQ (frequently asked questions) page on your website with links to various places you suggest that they visit.  You could organize the recommended places by categories such as restaurants, museums, parks, and so on.  

This helps your guests plan for their stay at your bed and breakfast and you can easily refer them to your website if they are calling or e-mailing you the question. I also recommend offering free brochures to local destinations to your guests while they visit in person.

Have you ever had a funny mix-up like mine with your bed and breakfast guests? I would love to hear about it in the comments below!

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Great Conversation Starters While Hosting Guests

 

conversation hosting guests

It is always a good idea to have some topics of conversation in mind if you regularly host guests at your bed and breakfast.  Having a mental list of what to talk about means you will feel comfortable interacting with perfect strangers at any time. The biggest secret to being a good conversationalist is simply allowing other people to talk about themselves. Why? It is a subject they probably know well and are comfortable talking about.

 

Since they are likely to be out of town guests when they visit, this automatically gives you some conversation topics, including the reason for their stay at your B&B.

  • Are you celebrating a special occasion(birthday, anniversary, reunion, etc.)?
  • What attracted you to visit us in this area?
  • Does our area have a leisure activity or event you will be participating in?
  • Where else have you been on vacation?
  • What was your most favorite vacation destination so far?
  • If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

People love talking about what they eat or want to eat.  Think about the popularity of Food Network and online recipe websites!  Inquire about their favorite foods including breakfast dishes.  During the time they book the room is the best time to find out if they are allergic to any foods or on a restricted diet since you, or your staff, will be cooking for them.  If you realize that question was never answered, take the first opportunity to ask.

  • What is your favorite food?
  • If you could only have one meal for the rest of your life, what would it be?
  • Where do you like to go when you eat out?
  • Do you like to cook? If so, do you have a signature dish?
  • Are there any foods that you would like to try?

If they bring up their family, then it is perfectly acceptable to have a discussion centered around that. Most people love talking about their family.  However, we need to be sensitive to people who may have strained family relationships, family members who are ill, infertility issues, or some other personal struggle in their lives.

  • Do you have any siblings?
  • What is your favorite childhood memory?
  • Did you have a pet growing up?  Do you have any pets now?
  • As a kid, how did you most like to spend your time?

Another topic of conversation could be about sports.  Since there are so many different sports, it is a safe bet that they, or someone they know, have an interest in sports.  They do not need to be a talented athlete to enjoy watching sports.

  • Do you play or follow any sports?
  • Who is your favorite athlete?
  • How do you like to exercise?
  • What is your favorite sports team?

Ask them about their technology and entertainment preferences.  This can lead to lively discussions about favorites.  Then you can mention (if it is available for them) that you offer a free Wi-Fi connection and/or a book, CD and/or DVD collection available for guests to borrow.

  • What are your favorite TV shows?
  • What kind of movies do you like?
  • What was the last movie you saw?
  • Who is your favorite actor/actress?
  • What is your favorite movie of all time?
  • What type of music do you like to listen to?  Who are your favorite musicians?
  • Do you like to read?  If so, what kind of books do you read?
  • What’s your favorite board game or card game?

Carefully ask about work, but try not to make it sound like a job interview.  Remember that your guest(s) may be studying, retired, or “between jobs”.  Also keep in mind your guest(s) may be traveling on business while they stay with you.

  • What do you do for a living? Where do you work (or study)?
  • What was your first job ever?
  • When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?
  • What do you like best about your job?
  • If money was no object yet you still wanted to work, what would be your dream job?

The key is to keep it light. The goal is to build rapport with your bed and breakfast guests.  Stick to topics that are interesting and entertaining to talk about.  Most people are looking for polite and lighthearted topics to discuss–it is wise to avoid controversial topics like politics and religion. Leave them with a great impression so they give you and your B&B a positive testimonial about your hospitality via your online guest book.

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

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10+ B&B Bedroom Names

B&B bedroom names

 

Bed and Breakfasts traditionally name each bedroom available to guests. This allows B&B owners, as well as their guests, to be able to distinguish between the rooms.  The B&B bedroom names can be based on any number of reasons.  Here are 10+ ways B&B bedroom names come about:

 

  • Activity (such as a hobby or a sport like photography or football)
  • Amenity (like a private hot tub or their own personal fireplace in the room)
  • Color in the room (like red or lavender walls or bedding)
  • Country or culture the room represents (such as China or Mexico)
  • Famous people (including famous writers and leaders like Hemingway and Lincoln)
  • History (named after the original residents; associated with the time period it was built)
  • Local connection (near a famous local attraction; common local flowers or foods)
  • Occasion (such as the Honeymoon Suite or Anniversary Room)
  • Style the room is decorated in (such as Victorian or French Country)
  • Theme (including a particular animal or season)
  • Type of location (such as on the beach or in a castle)

As bed and breakfast owners, you can have fun with what you name your rooms. Be creative and come up with names of rooms that people would like to say they stayed in. Sometimes B&B owners have signs by the doors to let guests know they have come to the right room.

Naming the rooms in your house gives your bed and breakfast character and distinguishes it from other B&B’s. This also allows your guests to recommend the particular rooms they stayed in by their B&B bedroom names to other people. 

You are welcome to share a link to your (named) rooms page on your bed and breakfast website as well as to tell us the reason they were named that way. 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

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How Do You Respond to Problem Guests?

respond-to-problem-guests

How do you respond to problem guests? How we respond to difficult people and trying circumstances reveals a lot about our character. Some may argue that our personality, as well as our past experiences, also play a role in how we react to setbacks. Regardless of all the contributing factors to our behavior, we all will face challenges that can make us either bitter or better.

How do you handle guest problems? Of course, not all problems (or guests for that matter) are the same. What works in one situation may not work in another. It is important to convey to all guests, that you place a high priority on their satisfaction with your hospitality services and their experience in your place of accommodations. Some times people just want to be heard, to know that you care, and to know something will be done to address their complaint.

The important thing is for problems to be resolved during their stay instead of finding out from a negative online review. However, if you are learning about any problems for the first time from an online review, please leave a thoughtful response which may include how you deal with that issue with future guests. You may want to offer that guest a free room upgrade or other perk if he or she comes back to stay again.  Be sure to get the conversation offline as soon as possible to avoid any negative publicity.

Your guests are members of the public that you extend your warmest hospitality. Some guests are more talkative than others while other guests are more private. Accounting for these personal differences means being able to sense when guests want to chit-chat or when they value their privacy.  Be available when guests need you, but also give them space.  

Successful bed and breakfast innkeepers (and their staff) excel in variety of areas. This includes: concierge services, cuisine, decorating, gardening, hospitality, housekeeping, maintenance, private event planning, renovations, and more. How we respond to problem guests can earn the respect of not only those experiencing the problem, but also potential guests reading online reviews about how the problem was handled.

Kristi Dement, of Bed and Breakfast Blogging, offers reputation management services. It is extremely important that all businesses manage their reputation. Contact Kristi if you are interested in learning more about how she can help you with that.

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The Secret to Improving Your Guest Experience

improving-your-guest-experience

If you want to know the secret to improving your guest experience, the answer is found in several areas of hospitality.  It begins by asking yourself questions like the following.

What do you find out about your guests before they stay at your inn?  When your guests book a room, do you learn the purpose of their visit?  Whether they have any food allergies or dietary restrictions?  Knowing these things can help you prepare.  

What on-site amenities do you offer your guests? Amenities can include free wireless internet throughout your inn, watching television and movies from the privacy of guest rooms, large hot tubs, indoor or outdoor pools, a game room, a workout room, spa treatments, a library, a conference room, privately stocked guest room refrigerators, 24-hour access to free refreshments and goodies, and so on.  The more amenities you have at your property, the more likely guests will write positive reviews of their experiences.  

Do you offer concierge services to your guests? This could range from making restaurant reservations, to arranging for spa treatments, procuring tickets to special events, assisting with various travel arrangements, and booking tours of local attractions.  

How does the innkeeper benefit from offering concierge services like these? You may set up partnerships with local restaurants, spas, event venues, tours, and travel options.  If you receive about as many referrals as you give, this may be a win-win situation with no need for an exchange of money from any of the parties. 

However, if it is more one-sided and you are not receiving as many business referrals as you are giving, then think about requesting a referral fee when you refer business to them and giving them a referral fee when they refer business to you. That way it is more equitable.   The point is to have a fair incentive to refer business to each other.

Do you host events? People often come to bed and breakfast inns because of celebrating special occasions.  You could host private parties for a variety of occasions, including: anniversaries, baby and wedding showers, birthdays, family reunions, graduations, and so on.  The more special you make these events for your guests, the better their guest experience.  

What kind of feedback are you receiving from guests about your food?  How well do you accommodate guests with food allergies and dietary restrictions?  Do guests ask for your recipes or if your inn sells a cookbook? Even if you are not the caterer for all of the events you host, the food you provide at events you host affects their guest experience and perceptions of you as hosts.

Do you offer custom packages for your guests? These could include restaurant gift certificates, tickets to a local event, fresh flowers, desserts delivered to your room, and so on.  Are you attracting the types of guests you would like to host? One way to do that is to offer packages they would be interested in.

How do your guests sleep?  Whether they are looking for a more restful sleep or a more passionate romance, make that possible for them.  Do you have extra blankets and pillows?  Do you offer a turn-down service or romance package with rose petals and LED lights?  

How will you know if your guests have had positive experiences?  Encourage feedback by asking non-intrusive questions (questions that do not pry, but show that you care about making sure they receive the best hospitality possible).  Read the comments in your guest books and online reviews.  Take guest advice to heart.  As you see evaluations of guest experiences increase, you will experience a tremendous amount of satisfaction.

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

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Do You Know What Your Guests Really Crave?

what-your-guests-really-crave

Do you know what your guests really crave? What Customers Crave: How to Create Relevant and Memorable Experiences at Every Touchpoint by popular speaker and corporate strategist Nicholas J. Webb gives more insight into the desires of customers.  Mr. Webb explains with customers being able to rate their experiences and express their opinions online so easily, especially on websites like Amazon, TripAdvisor, and Yelp; there has been an irreversible shift of power from businesses to consumers. There is no place to hide for those who deliver poor products and services because they will be vetted by customers who will share that information throughout cyberspace forever. 

Mr. Nicholas Webb argues that we, as business people, first must understand our consumers better and then create relevant experiences to specific customer types.  What does he mean by “types”?  Simply, knowing what customers love and what customers hate.  Make the effort to understand what customer types we serve, and then learn what those types love and what they hate to design beautiful experiences throughout your time together.

5 Critical Touchpoints:

  • The pre-touch moment is when your potential guests are checking you out online and looking at how you maintain your inn.
  • The first-touch moment sets the theme for how your customer will view their experience with you.
  • The core-touch moment represents how you serve them throughout their stay.
  • The past-touch moment is the final experience they have with you so send them off with a memorable good-bye, so they want to come back. 
  • The in-touch moment is how you stay connected with them after their experience with you.  Consistently and pleasantly provide them with ongoing value so they willingly want to come back.  This is not the time to be sales-y.

When you go far above what they expect, you have given them a memorable experience.  Listen to your customers.  Read their comments in reviews and in your guest books.  Ask your guests when they book how they found you and if there is a reason for their visit. 

Webb advises that you must invent the experiences that fit your market, service product, and customer types. Not sure of your audience(s)? Create a one-sentence mission statement that is powerful and to the point.  It should define the foundation for why you are in business.  

The author writes about an experience he had staying at a luxury hotel in San Jose, California.  At the extravagant price he was charged, he expected an extraordinarily high level of service.  He was disappointed with several things:

  • He found a plastic card informing him that he would be paying $29.99 a night for internet service (most B&B inns offer free wireless internet)
  • There was a large Evian bottle with a card hanging from its neck reading, “Enjoy this for $19.95” (B&B inns are known for giving their guests access to free refreshments and goodies)
  • On the back of the remote there was a sticker warning him that if he stole the remote, he would be charged for it (given the unlikelihood of a “remote-control heist”, he said he would forgo the label that insults a customer’s integrity)

Webb points out that when your customers love you, they will buy more and stay longer all while referring their friends and family to stay with you.  However, if you deliver only what your customers expect, Webb states that you will lose your guests to a competitor that wows them.  The “innovation zone” is where you begin to exceed your customers’ expectations.  The better you get at this, the further you will rise.  

What gets even better is that your customers will become your marketing machines through social media and word of mouth and you will rapidly build a reputation as the best place to stay in your local area.  Satisfied customers will nurture you with sales, repeat visits, referrals, and incredibly powerful ratings on social media as well as through digital sharing.  

Nicholas Webb reminds us that acquiring new guests is much more expensive than keeping current guests.  That is why we should deliver exceptional and relevant experiences to build an excellent reputation across all touch points and to all customer types.  

If your price is less than the value customers expect, you will increase sales as well as happy customers.  However, if the price exceeds the value customers expect to receive from you, they will leave in droves.  

As you begin to distinguish between customer types, your perspective on how you view customer expectations changes. You can see the world through your customers’ eyes, including what they love and what they hate.  

You customers can clue you in to areas that need improvement and tell you how to improve them, which allows you to provide the most exceptional and relevant experiences.  Reward your guests who present ideas on how to improve their experience at various touchpoints.  If customers leave because they are not being properly served, your hospitality business eventually fails.  

Mr. Webb advocates for collaboration with people in your same industry since it can add to greater mutual prosperity through an exchange of ideas, experiences, and skills.  This explains why bed and breakfast inn associations are a great resource.  There is strength in coming together as fellow proprietors who want to offer the best hospitality possible.  

Your customers can do a complete background search on your business literally in seconds. To stay on top of your business reputation, Nicholas recommends using Google Alerts on keywords that are relevant to your business name, industry, and competition.

Put together a contest encouraging people to specify what they love and what they hate in overnight accommodations.  Reward prizes to the top three people who offer most helpful suggestions (such as a free night’s stay or free room upgrade during their next visit).  

Mr. Webb gives practical tips for making an upset customer (guest) a lifelong guest in five easy steps:

  • State to the customer that you intend to listen to them and work hard to make them happy.
  • Know that sometimes you just need to remain quiet while the customer releases steam and talks about why they are upset (if you listen carefully, you can learn what will make them happy).
  • Confirm with them that you heard them correctly by restating it back to them and asking if that is correct.
  • Offer a solution based on what you learned from carefully listening.
  • Follow up on the mistake to make sure you met with their approval (this shows them that making the situation right was a priority for you & your inn).

Great organizations love their customers and want them to be happy.  Businesses get better when companies get better.  Constantly look for ways to reinvent the customer experience by removing pain and adding pleasure.  

Always leave your guests wanting more!  Continue to provide exceptional service throughout their stay.  Customer experiences are not just one event, but a series of events.  Think of your last touch as a way to prove to your guests that you love and cherish the relationship.  Then continue the relationship by offering personal, relevant, and valuable information on your website, in social media, and in e-newsletters.  

Providing excellent service is vital to those in the hospitality industry.  Mr. Webb stated that one of his clients who operates high-end lodges and resort hotels started having team members take pictures of the guests throughout their stay and a few weeks after guests returned home, they would receive a complimentary and beautifully bound photo album ($40) delivered to them (for less than $20).  Annual re-bookings increased by 78%!

What’s more is that hundreds of customers posted the pictures on their social media which resulted in a 20% uptick in new bookings because of this practice.  Today, guests are also sent a digital photo album to make it easier for them to share their photos on influential social networks.  This proved to be a fabulous idea well worth the investment because of the additional business (from returning guests and new guests).

Taking Mr. Nicholas Webb’s advice, we should discover what our guests love and what they hate.  Of course, this depends upon who we are trying to attract.  What types of guests stay at your B&B?  Are these your ideal guests?  What do your ideal guests love and what do they hate?   Keep track of all of your ideas, brainstorm with employees or others in your industry, and listen to your guests, so you can know what your guests really crave.

Note: I receive Amazon Affiliate commissions from purchases made through the Amazon link.

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Make It All About Your Bed and Breakfast Guests

make it all about them

Make it all about them. Make it all about your bed and breakfast guests.  Author Bruce Turkel, in his insightful book All about Them: Grow Your Business by Focusing on Others makes it clear that what really matters to consumers is their own self-interest. Business owners (including innkeepers) can use that knowledge to make their businesses (specifically bed and breakfasts) about the people they are trying to reach (potential guests).

 

Author Bruce Turkel states that successful businesses created for today’s “all about them” economy realize what you do is less important than identifying who you are and why that resonates with current and potential customers (guests).  

 

Turkel stresses that “good brands make you feel good, but great brands make you feel good about yourself.” Things sell not because of what they can do, but because of how they make consumers feel.  

 

What attracts business to you and separates you from the competition (other accommodations)? Understand exactly what your customers are buying.  What do you provide that they cannot find anywhere else?  

 

Figure out who you are and what you stand for then communicate that identity.  Translate your message into customer centered communication that resonates with your audience.

 

What opportunities does your business provide for increasing customer satisfaction and company revenue?  What do you stand for?  Can you describe that in just a few words?  To determine what those few words are, Turkel recommends you consider five components.  

 

  • First, write down your company features and benefits.  This means everything you and your business offer including products, services, talents, skills, experiences, and so on.

 

  • Then write down your points of distinction.  What sets you apart from your competition? What do your clients identify about you?

 

  • Next, focus on the functional side of your business.  What features and attributes do you offer?

 

  • Then focus on the emotional side of your business.  How do your customers feel?

 

  • Lastly, this is when you can take reflect upon that information and know what you stand for and know who you are.  This is your brand promise.   

 

Innkeepers, do you make it all about your bed and breakfast guests?  Do potential guests know how you are different from other accommodations in your area?  

 

If you need help defining what makes your inn unique, so you stand out from other lodging choices, the Bed and Breakfast Blogging team is here to help.  Contact Kristi Dement for a free consultation today and she can start help you share your inn’s story with the world!

 

Note: I receive Amazon Affiliate commissions from purchases made through the Amazon link.

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The Four Doors Of Innkeeping

four doors of innkeeping

 

The Four Doors of Innkeeping is based on the book The Four Doors: A Guide to Joy, Freedom, and a Meaningful Life by #1 New York Times bestselling author Richard Paul Evans.  There are more than 17 million copies of his books in print worldwide, translated in more than 24 languages.

 

Door #1: Believe There’s a Reason You Were Born

 

Never underestimate the power of belief. Not only is there a reason you were born, but there is a reason that you are an innkeeper.  Just like teachers with their students, you will never know the amount of lives you touch for the better as you host and serve your bed and breakfast guests. Remember that as you extend warm hospitality to each of them.

 

Door #2: Free Yourself from Limitations

 

Most of our greatest learning experiences (and successes) come because of adversity (and failures). Everyone has problems.  It’s how we deal with them that matters. If you had to deal with (or are in the process of overcoming) zoning issues, renovation problems, or even a public relations nightmare, you can come out better on the other side.

 

Door #3: Magnify Your Life

 

Dreaming is the first step to making our lives greater.  Ask yourself, “What if…?” Be willing to take risks. We should use our talents and gifts to make more out of our lives.  This could mean that in addition to running a bed and breakfast inn, that you may add a restaurant, a gift shop, or even a spa.  

 

Door #4: Develop a Love-Centered Map

 

Love is the secret to joy.  The greatest source of happiness comes from giving and receiving love. Love is what love does. We develop love through service.  Love is both the destination and the journey.  As you appropriately love your guests, they will come become repeat visitors as well as spread by word of mouth (and hopefully online reviews) their enjoyable experience as your guests.

 

The author reminds us that we have a choice to live a more abundant life, a life of joy, freedom, and meaning.  We can improve our lives by opening these four doors of innkeeping. Feel free to comment below about how these four doors relate to you and your innkeeping experiences.

 

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