Category Archives: Guests

Do You Know How To Have The Storytelling Edge?

The Storytelling Edge book cover, word success, word customer, books

 

 

The Storytelling Edge, by Joe Lazauskas & Shane Snow, explains why businesses can succeed by telling stories. Everyone likes a good story. Stories make presentations better and ideas stick. Storytelling helps people remember you (over your competition). Great stories build relationships and make people care.

The Elements of Great Storytelling:

  • Relatability: your ideal guest should relate to the stories you tell
  • Novelty: while people crave the familiar, we also pay attention to what is new
  • Tension: conflict or curiosity gap (between what is and what could be) turns a good story into a great story
  • Fluency: great writing is easy to understand so people can focus on the story

Great stories (whether funny, fictional, or true) can dramatically increase your business. You need a mission that drives your content and resonates with people. You want readers to spend a lot of time reading your content and sharing it on their social media. Tell them stories they will remember. Evaluate what types of stories are working to share the right content with the right people.

Businesses that have the best relationships with their customers are those who tell stories. Figure out what your ideal guests want before you decide what technology to use. Create the content. Connect with your readers. Optimize both what you create and how you deliver the content.

Branding is whether and how people think of you. The stories we tell influence people’s perceptions of us. Conversion occurs when people take an action such as booking a room or calling your inn. The most powerful place to connect with your audience is on your website.

There are three main types of content. Timely content is pertinent based on news or current events. Seasonal content is relevant because of the time of year. Thirdly, evergreen content is valuable no matter when the audience sees or hears it.

Make sure you know what you want to achieve with your content. Then you can figure out what measurements matter the most. For example, if you want to promote aspect about your inn, such as its history, you could share a true story about the original owners.

The Future of Brand Storytelling:

  • Strategy: figure out what kind of story your audience wants, determine how you’ll reach them
  • Plan: decide how you will pull off your strategy
  • Create: create your story and make the right decisions to tell the best story possible
  • Activate: get your stories out there and use them to build connections with your ideal guests
  • Optimize: figure out what stories worked and tweak your strategy to do even better next time

Every story becomes part of your overarching story. The goal is to consistently tell your story in a variety of ways over time. Use stories to build relationships and make people care about you and your accommodations. Engage potential guests to build lifetime value with them. It is much easier to get guests to return than to find new guests every time! Use what is taught in The Storytelling Edge to attract more business!

 

How To Increase Your Revenue and Improve Your Results

Inside of cabin with brown wrap around coach, stone by wood burning fireplace

 

 

Do you know what your ideal guests want? Who are you trying to attract to stay at your inn? The more you understand about who you want to serve, the better you become at meeting their specific needs.

Know What Your Guests Love About You and Your Inn

Are you getting their attention with the headlines you use? What do you receive the most compliments about from your guests? Be sure to feature what you know guests love.

The Benefits Of Frequent Guests and Guest Referrals

It is much easier to host returning guests than to find new guests. Do you offer incentives for frequent stays? Do you reward guests who refer you new business? This could be complimentary room upgrades and other incentives.

There Are Other Ways To Earn Money (Besides Overnight Stays)

Do you offer more than just the option of staying overnight? There are other ways of earning additional money. Why limit your hospitality earning potential?

Earn More By Offering Related Guest Products

You can offer additional related products and services to “up-sell” your guests. Of course, they have to really want what you offer. The best way to know what your guests want, is to ask them directly!

Increase Your Income With Guest Packages

Be sure to show professional pictures of each item for sale or that comes as part of a package. Guest packages can be centered around activities, specific themes, special occasions, and the four seasons. Think about what your guests like to do and the common reasons for their visit.

Host Events and Groups To Boost Your Earnings

You can also host private events and groups. Do you have enough space to host weddings and/or private local groups? The more details you can provide, the more inquiries you will receive.

Most People Buy Based Upon Their Emotions (Not Logic)

Do you tap into their fear of missing out? Most people making purchasing decisions based on their emotions. Expiration dates motivate!

Share Content That People Can Connect With

Do you provide them with enough content (blog posts, emails, website information, social media) to convince them that your place is the next place they want to visit? Share inspiring stories.

Prominently Feature Your Guest Testimonials

Do you feature guest testimonials on your website and in your social media? People put more stock into what previous guests say about you than what you say about you. That is why online review sites are so popular.

In Summary

The more of these suggestions you implement, the greater your odds of hospitality success. You can become the go-to accommodations in your local area.

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

How To Easily Attract More Guests To Your Inn

bedroom with trey ceiling with open glass doors overlooking balcony

 

 

 

How to easily attract more guests to your inn?  One key component is to focus on good things to do, things to see, food to taste, places to explore, and places to go in your local area.

 

 

First, ask yourself these questions:

  • Why do most people visit our local area? (ex: for a romantic getaway in a secluded area or in a bustling city with lots of culture)
  • What do people like to do when they visit my area? (ex: attend a major business conference or participate in a marathon for your favorite cause)
  • How could I convince someone to want to visit my area? (ex: write great content about your local area and develop a reputation for showing warm hospitality to your guests)
  • Do I ask for guests to give me great online reviews?  Tell guests when they arrive,  that if for some reason they do not have a five star experience with you, to let them know in person how it could have been better.  For the few who were disappointed, perhaps offer them an upgraded room or some other perk if they decide to return again.  Make it your marketing mission to get 5 star reviews online so others will want to visit.

As you read this list, think about what you could feature in your local area:

Things to Do

  • Bowling
  • Canoeing
  • Cycling
  • Dancing
  • Fairs
  • Festivals
  • Fishing
  • Golf
  • Horseback riding
  • Hunting
  • Local shopping
  • Marathons
  • Miniature golf
  • Quilting
  • Reading
  • Shopping
  • Spa relaxing
  • Sports
  • Walking
  • Writing
  • Yoga

Things to See

  • Ballet
  • Bird watching
  • Book stores
  • Circus
  • Comedy
  • Concerts
  • Movies
  • Parades
  • Photography
  • Sporting events
  • Theatre

Food to Taste

  • Bakeries
  • Bars
  • Coffee shops
  • Food trucks
  • Ice cream parlors
  • Picnicking
  • Restaurants

Places to Explore

  • Attractions
  • Colleges and universities
  • Galleries
  • Historical landmarks
  • House hunting
  • Lakes
  • Malls
  • Mountains
  • Museums
  • Parks

Places to Go

  • Arenas
  • Churches
  • Conferences
  • Retreats
  • Stadiums
  • Workshops

bed in front of brick fireplace

 

Another important key to attract more guests is to establish relationships with these other local proprietors. Perhaps the business person will give you a reasonable deal in exchange for exclusively their particular type of business (such as using only one local florist for all of your flower arrangements).  Consider putting together guest packages that include local area businesses:

 

  • Reservations at a nearby restaurant
  • Tickets to a local game
  • Gift certificate to a relaxing spa (or your own spa)

When you categorize your blog posts, this allows your web visitors to easily go to the content that best fits their needs.  For example, some of my blog categories include:

  • Activities
  • Amenities
  • Conferences
  • Events
  • Food
  • Guests
  • Publicity
  • Renovating
  • Success

Write about what makes your area a destination for most people.  For some, this could mean featuring local concerts at your popular entertainment venues or dishes from award-winning restaurants.  If your bed and breakfast is in a place known for popular events (such as film festivals), be sure to promote that.

Write about things that make your inn unique.  Give them reasons to choose your inn for their accommodations.  Does your bed and breakfast have its own restaurant, horse farm, gift shop, spa, or something else?  Maybe you have amenities such as hot tubs and fireplaces in private guest rooms.  For those who cater to the business traveler, be sure to talk about your free wi-fi internet access as well as desks with comfortable office chairs.

In summary, write blog posts and put on social media the things that are popular in your local area as well as what makes your inn so special.  Offer packages that include things only found in your area.  Be sure to encourage five star reviews from your guests.  This is how you will easily attract more guests to your bed and breakfast inn!

 

Images by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

Assumptions Can Be Wrong

three large windmills outside by lake with colorful sunset

Your bed and breakfast guests usually have questions. Be careful to understand their frame of reference when they ask a question. Assumptions can be wrong!

While I was a young student at Michigan State University, I lived in an international dorm. For those of you who don’t know, Michigan State is located in East Lansing, Michigan. One of the reasons I chose to attend the university was that I lived only two hours away in a town called Holland, Michigan.

When an international student asked me what I was going to do over the weekend, I replied, “Go home to Holland.” She looked shocked and asked with a puzzled look, “Only for the weekend?” I had failed to take into account that she was thinking of Holland, Netherlands. Actually, the Netherlands is the country my great-grandmother and her family came from when they relocated to Holland, Michigan.

We laughed when we both understood we were talking about two completely different parts of the world. I wrongly assumed that since we were both currently living in the state of Michigan, that she would have heard of my local Michigan town called Holland! Remember assumptions can be wrong!

Often when recommending places your guests can visit and things they can do in your area, please remember my advice to never make assumptions. You could have an FAQ (frequently asked questions) page on your website with links to various places you suggest that they visit.  You could organize the recommended places by categories such as restaurants, museums, parks, and so on.

This helps your guests plan for their stay at your bed and breakfast and you can easily refer them to your website if they are calling or e-mailing you the question. I also recommend offering free brochures to local destinations to your guests while they visit in person.

Have you ever had a funny mix-up like mine with your bed and breakfast guests? I would love to hear about it in the comments below!

Great Conversation Starters While Hosting Guests

 

partially covered deck with chairs and picnic table overlooking lake with trees

It is always a good idea to have some topics of conversation in mind if you regularly host guests at your bed and breakfast.  Having a mental list of what to talk about means you will feel comfortable interacting with perfect strangers at any time. The biggest secret to being a good conversationalist is simply allowing other people to talk about themselves. Why? It is a subject they probably know well and are comfortable talking about.

 

Since they are likely to be out of town guests when they visit, this automatically gives you some conversation topics, including the reason for their stay at your B&B.

  • Are you celebrating a special occasion(birthday, anniversary, reunion, etc.)?
  • What attracted you to visit us in this area?
  • Does our area have a leisure activity or event you will be participating in?
  • Where else have you been on vacation?
  • What was your most favorite vacation destination so far?
  • If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

People love talking about what they eat or want to eat.  Think about the popularity of Food Network and online recipe websites!  Inquire about their favorite foods including breakfast dishes.  During the time they book the room is the best time to find out if they are allergic to any foods or on a restricted diet since you, or your staff, will be cooking for them.  If you realize that question was never answered, take the first opportunity to ask.

  • What is your favorite food?
  • If you could only have one meal for the rest of your life, what would it be?
  • Where do you like to go when you eat out?
  • Do you like to cook? If so, do you have a signature dish?
  • Are there any foods that you would like to try?

If they bring up their family, then it is perfectly acceptable to have a discussion centered around that. Most people love talking about their family.  However, we need to be sensitive to people who may have strained family relationships, family members who are ill, infertility issues, or some other personal struggle in their lives.

  • Do you have any siblings?
  • What is your favorite childhood memory?
  • Did you have a pet growing up?  Do you have any pets now?
  • As a kid, how did you most like to spend your time?

Another topic of conversation could be about sports.  Since there are so many different sports, it is a safe bet that they, or someone they know, have an interest in sports.  They do not need to be a talented athlete to enjoy watching sports.

  • Do you play or follow any sports?
  • Who is your favorite athlete?
  • How do you like to exercise?
  • What is your favorite sports team?

Ask them about their technology and entertainment preferences.  This can lead to lively discussions about favorites.  Then you can mention (if it is available for them) that you offer a free Wi-Fi connection and/or a book, CD and/or DVD collection available for guests to borrow.

  • What are your favorite TV shows?
  • What kind of movies do you like?
  • What was the last movie you saw?
  • Who is your favorite actor/actress?
  • What is your favorite movie of all time?
  • What type of music do you like to listen to?  Who are your favorite musicians?
  • Do you like to read?  If so, what kind of books do you read?
  • What’s your favorite board game or card game?

Carefully ask about work, but try not to make it sound like a job interview.  Remember that your guest(s) may be studying, retired, or “between jobs”.  Also keep in mind your guest(s) may be traveling on business while they stay with you.

  • What do you do for a living? Where do you work (or study)?
  • What was your first job ever?
  • When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?
  • What do you like best about your job?
  • If money was no object yet you still wanted to work, what would be your dream job?

The key is to keep it light. The goal is to build rapport with your bed and breakfast guests.  Stick to topics that are interesting and entertaining to talk about.  Most people are looking for polite and lighthearted topics to discuss–it is wise to avoid controversial topics like politics and religion. Leave them with a great impression so they give you and your B&B a positive testimonial about your hospitality via your online guest book.

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

How Do You Respond to Problem Guests?

black and white wall paper with 7 separate plain white doors

How do you respond to problem guests? How we respond to difficult people and trying circumstances reveals a lot about our character. Some may argue that our personality, as well as our past experiences, also play a role in how we react to setbacks. Regardless of all the contributing factors to our behavior, we all will face challenges that can make us either bitter or better.

How do you handle guest problems? Of course, not all problems (or guests for that matter) are the same. What works in one situation may not work in another. It is important to convey to all guests, that you place a high priority on their satisfaction with your hospitality services and their experience in your place of accommodations. Some times people just want to be heard, to know that you care, and to know something will be done to address their complaint.

The important thing is for problems to be resolved during their stay instead of finding out from a negative online review. However, if you are learning about any problems for the first time from an online review, please leave a thoughtful response which may include how you deal with that issue with future guests. You may want to offer that guest a free room upgrade or other perk if he or she comes back to stay again.  Be sure to get the conversation offline as soon as possible to avoid any negative publicity.

Your guests are members of the public that you extend your warmest hospitality. Some guests are more talkative than others while other guests are more private. Accounting for these personal differences means being able to sense when guests want to chit-chat or when they value their privacy.  Be available when guests need you, but also give them space.

Successful bed and breakfast innkeepers (and their staff) excel in variety of areas. This includes: concierge services, cuisine, decorating, gardening, hospitality, housekeeping, maintenance, private event planning, renovations, and more. How we respond to problem guests can earn the respect of not only those experiencing the problem, but also potential guests reading online reviews about how the problem was handled.

Kristi Dement, of Bed and Breakfast Blogging, offers reputation management services. It is extremely important that all businesses manage their reputation. Contact Kristi if you are interested in learning more about how she can help you with that.

The Secret to Improving Your Guest Experience

luxurious outdoor pool with landscaping and chairs around it

If you want to know the secret to improving your guest experience, the answer is found in several areas of hospitality.  It begins by asking yourself questions like the following.

What do you find out about your guests before they stay at your inn?  When your guests book a room, do you learn the purpose of their visit?  Whether they have any food allergies or dietary restrictions?  Knowing these things can help you prepare.

What on-site amenities do you offer your guests? Amenities can include free wireless internet throughout your inn, watching television and movies from the privacy of guest rooms, large hot tubs, indoor or outdoor pools, a game room, a workout room, spa treatments, a library, a conference room, privately stocked guest room refrigerators, 24-hour access to free refreshments and goodies, and so on.  The more amenities you have at your property, the more likely guests will write positive reviews of their experiences.

Do you offer concierge services to your guests? This could range from making restaurant reservations, to arranging for spa treatments, procuring tickets to special events, assisting with various travel arrangements, and booking tours of local attractions.

How does the innkeeper benefit from offering concierge services like these? You may set up partnerships with local restaurants, spas, event venues, tours, and travel options.  If you receive about as many referrals as you give, this may be a win-win situation with no need for an exchange of money from any of the parties.

However, if it is more one-sided and you are not receiving as many business referrals as you are giving, then think about requesting a referral fee when you refer business to them and giving them a referral fee when they refer business to you. That way it is more equitable.   The point is to have a fair incentive to refer business to each other.

Do you host events? People often come to bed and breakfast inns because of celebrating special occasions.  You could host private parties for a variety of occasions, including: anniversaries, baby and wedding showers, birthdays, family reunions, graduations, and so on.  The more special you make these events for your guests, the better their guest experience.

What kind of feedback are you receiving from guests about your food?  How well do you accommodate guests with food allergies and dietary restrictions?  Do guests ask for your recipes or if your inn sells a cookbook? Even if you are not the caterer for all of the events you host, the food you provide at events you host affects their guest experience and perceptions of you as hosts.

Do you offer custom packages for your guests? These could include restaurant gift certificates, tickets to a local event, fresh flowers, desserts delivered to your room, and so on.  Are you attracting the types of guests you would like to host? One way to do that is to offer packages they would be interested in.

How do your guests sleep?  Whether they are looking for a more restful sleep or a more passionate romance, make that possible for them.  Do you have extra blankets and pillows?  Do you offer a turn-down service or romance package with rose petals and LED lights?

How will you know if your guests have had positive experiences?  Encourage feedback by asking non-intrusive questions (questions that do not pry, but show that you care about making sure they receive the best hospitality possible).  Read the comments in your guest books and online reviews.  Take guest advice to heart.  As you see evaluations of guest experiences increase, you will experience a tremendous amount of satisfaction.

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

Easy Ways to Better Understand Your Guests Lifestyles

understand your guests lifestyles

Understand your guests lifestyles to satisfy their unique needs.  The more information you know about your potential guests, the better you are able to target your marketing messages and offer attractive hospitality services.  There is no point in trying to be everything to everyone.  It is rarely possible to satisfy all customers in the same way.  When you know what your potential guests’ values and what motivates them, you are better able to attract them.

 

Understand your guests lifestyles are based on motivations, needs, and wants:

  • Activities: actions pursued for pleasure or relaxation
  • Attitudes: feelings about people, things, or situations
  • Beliefs: trust, faith, or confidence in someone or something
  • Interests: curiosity, attention, or concerns about something
  • Opinions: judgments or ways of thinking about something
  • Values: important and lasting ideals

These lifestyle factors can explain why your audience buys the products and services they do.  There is power in knowing how your prospects make their buying decisions.

How you package and promote your services is a key component of your marketing strategy.  Put together a list of different guest personas you want to attract that is based on what is in your local area, your unique talents, and your amenities.

 

First, ask yourself these three questions:

What is in my local area? This could be anything from college campuses, to concert venues, to national parks, to business conferences.  Once you know what is in your local area, you can better understand your potential guests’ lifestyles.

What are my unique talents?  If you are an official tour guide (local trail and/or hiking tours), a party planner (excellent anniversary parties), a massage therapist (with a spa on site), a vegetarian-only chef (cooking for vegetarians and vegans), then you have a better idea of the lifestyles’ of the guests you want to attract.

What amenities do I provide my guests?  This could be anything from game rooms, to gardens, to hot tubs, to luxurious linens, to indoor and/or outdoor pools, to tea rooms.  Understand what amenities you have that are attractive to potential guests.

 

Then segment your customers into different personas.  For example:

  • Adventurers
  • Antique lovers
  • Art and drama lovers
  • Board game players
  • Business groups
  • Business travelers
  • Class reunion attendees
  • Environmentally conscious people
  • History buffs
  • Hobby lovers
  • Honeymooners
  • Mystery lovers
  • Pet owners
  • Readers
  • Relaxation seekers
  • Shoppers
  • Sight seers
  • Spa lovers
  • Special occasion celebrators
  • Sports spectators
  • Vegetarians
  • Wedding guests
  • Wine lovers

These are easy ways to better understand your guests lifestyles.  Then you can promote your place of hospitality (bed and breakfast, inn, resort, restaurant, etc.) on your website and through social media.

Kristi Dement at Bed and Breakfast Blogging can help you attract more guests.  Click here to contact me and/or feel free to comment below on what you do to attract more guests.

 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

B&B Travel Packing List

travel packing list

 

Does your bed and breakfast suggest a B&B Travel Packing List?  Depending upon where you are located, your suggestions of what they should bring will vary.  Location, season, climate, and local attractions and recreation all play a part in determining your recommendations.

 

Keep in mind, your guests may be driving or flying.  You may be hosting international guests.  This B&B Travel Packing List is meant as a suggestion and can be tailored to fit what is appropriate for your guests.

You can put the list up on your own website as a courtesy to your guests.  You also do not have to go into as much detail as we have chosen to do.  There will likely be things that you can think of that are not on this list.  This is a starting point for developing your own travel packing list.

Important Necessities:

  • Addresses of friends and family
  • Airline tickets
  • Calling card
  • Car rental confirmations
  • Cash
  • Contact info for bank and credit card companies
  • Copy of traveler’s insurance policy
  • Credit and ATM cards
  • Directions
  • Driver’s license and photocopies
  • E-tickets
  • Emergency Contacts
  • Gift certificates or giftcards
  • Guidebook(s)
  • House keys
  • Identification
  • Insurance information
  • Itineraries
  • List of medications
  • Lodging information and reservations
  • Maps
  • Medical and vaccination records
  • Membership cards (AAA, frequent flier)
  • Money belt/pouch
  • Passport, visa(s) and photocopies
  • Reservation confirmations
  • Tickets to concerts, events, and games
  • Traveler’s checks

Personal Items and Hygiene

  • Aftershave
  • Body lotion
  • Cologne/perfume
  • Contact lenses and solution
  • Cosmetics
  • Cotton swabs/cotton balls
  • Deodorant
  • Eye drops
  • Face wash
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Floss
  • Glasses
  • Hairbrush/comb
  • Hair care products
  • Hair styling appliances
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Lip balm
  • Lotions
  • Makeup
  • Makeup remover
  • Moisturizers
  • Moist towelettes
  • Mouthwash
  • Nail clippers/files
  • Shampoo/conditioner
  • Shaving supplies
  • Soap
  • Sunscreen
  • Tissues/paper towels
  • Toiletry bag
  • Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste
  • Towel/wash cloth
  • Tweezers

Clothing and Accessories

  • Belts
  • Comfortable walking shoes
  • Dresses
  • Dress shoes
  • Exercise clothing
  • Extra hangers
  • Gloves/mittens
  • Hats
  • Hiking boots
  • Jacket/fleece
  • Jeans
  • Jewelry
  • Knit hat
  • Long underwear
  • Pajamas/sleepwear
  • Pants/trousers
  • Rain boots
  • Rainwear
  • Sandals
  • Scarves
  • Shirts (dressy and/or casual)
  • Shorts
  • Shower shoes
  • Skirts
  • Slippers
  • Socks
  • Stockings
  • Suits
  • Sweaters
  • Sweatshirts
  • Swimsuit/Cover-up
  • Ties
  • T-shirts
  • Undergarments
  • Watch
  • Water shoes
  • Wide-brimmed hat

Medications and Health

  • Allergy pills
  • Anti-itch cream
  • Bandages
  • Cold medicine
  • First-aid kit
  • Herbal supplements
  • Insect repellant
  • Motion sickness remedies
  • Nausea and diarrhea remedies
  • Pain relievers
  • Prescriptions
  • Sleep medications
  • Vitamins

Technology

  • Batteries
  • Camera and charger
  • Cell phone and charger
  • Converters and adapters
  • E-books
  • Electronic chargers
  • Extension cord(s)
  • Film
  • GPS
  • Laptop and accessories
  • MP3 player
  • Memory cards
  • PDA
  • Shortwave radio
  • Tablet/e-reader
  • Travel alarm clock
  • Underwater camera
  • Video camera and charger
  • Video player
  • Walkie-talkies

On the Plane

  • Books or magazines
  • Chewing gum
  • Earplugs
  • Eye mask
  • Quart-size bag for liquids/gels
  • Tissues
  • Travel blanket

In the Car

  • Antifreeze
  • Driving directions
  • Ice scraper
  • Jumper cables
  • Keys
  • Maps
  • Motor oil
  • Pillow and blanket
  • Spare tire or donut
  • Windshield wiper fluid

Outdoors

  • Beach bag
  • Beach towel
  • Binoculars
  • Compass/GPS
  • Flashlight
  • Insect repellent
  • Lighter
  • Rain poncho
  • Shortwave radio
  • Sleeping bag
  • Sunglasses
  • Sunhat
  • Sunscreen
  • Umbrella
  • Water bottles

Entertainment

  • CD’s/DVD’s
  • Playing cards
  • Portable DVD player
  • Travel games
  • Video games

Miscellaneous

  • Cooler
  • Drinks
  • Double-sided/duct tape
  • Highlighters
  • Laundry (bag, soap, stain remover)
  • Journal
  • Pen(s)
  • Pet items (if traveling to pet-friendly bed and breakfast)
  • Plastic bags
  • Puzzles (crosswords, jigsaw, word search)
  • Safety pins
  • Sewing kit
  • Snacks
  • Swiss army knife
  • Toys (if traveling with children)

Guests will be bringing purses, tote bags, carry-ons, suitcases, and other luggage.  Thanks to your handy packing list, guests will be less likely to forget bringing something they wanted to have during their stay at your lovely bed and breakfast.

 

Image by Marcus Berg of Unique Angles Photography

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